Comfortably-Numb-Tapped-Keyboard-Part

Tapping Comfortably Numb

Looking to other instruments for inspiration can be a valuable resource for moving your playing ahead.

In this lesson we are going to take a look at the keyboard part from the B section of Comfortably Numb by Pink Floyd as written by the late Richard Wright.

The part is basically made up of descending arpeggios that outline the chords being played. Playing the chords in this way adds a nice dream-like atmosphere to the whole section.

Richard also uses a bit of voice leading here which creates a smooth sounding transition between the chords.

Comfortably Numb | Tapping the Keyboard Part

Keyboard Tapping Tabs

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Download the Guitar Pro Tab Here

Comfortably-Numb-Soloing-Tapped-Keyboard-Part

 

3-note-per-string-pentatonics-lesson-3

Three Note Per String Pentatonics 3

Continuing with our three note per string pentatonics series let’s take a look at an idea inspired by the amazing fusion guitarist Frank Gambale.

Frank is known for his advanced sweep picking techniques. When playing the pentatonic scale he combines two fingerings to make it easier to sweep.

I’m not the worlds best sweep picker but I do enjoy the freedom and speed that Frank’s grouping offers.

For this lesson we’ll be combining the first two shapes. This technique requires some pretty wide stretches if you’re not used to it you could hurt yourself, so take it slow and you’ll get it over time

There Note Per String E Minor/G Major PentatonicThree-Note-per-String-Pentatonics

A good way to finger these exercises is by using your first finger (index) on the 12th fret and your fourth finger (pinky) on the 16th & 17th fret. On the middle notes switch between your second and third fingers.

Three Note Pentatonic Exercise 5

Three-Note-Per-String-Pentatonics-Ex-5

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Download the GuitarPro file here 

 

Three Note Pentatonic Exercise 6

Three-Note-Per-String-Pentatonics-Ex-6

Download the PDF here
Download the GuitarPro file here

3-note-per-string-pentatonics-lesson-2

Three Note Per String Pentatonics 2

If you’ve been playing guitar for a while you know about “The Box” and being stuck inside it.

For those of you that don’t know, “The Box” refers to the MinorPentatonic shape that is the first scale nearly every guitarist learns.

As far as scales go the Minor Pentatonic is a useful one. It sounds great used in many different styles of music and lends itself nicely to playing blues solos.

However many players get stuck there and can’t navigate away from that shape when improvising.

One way to break free from the box is to look to the other four shape on the pentatonic scale.

An interesting way to do this is by combining two of these shapes together. This can be done with any two pentatonic shapes that appear next to one another. For this lesson we’ll be combining the first two shapes.

This technique requires some pretty wide stretches if you’re not used to it you could hurt yourself, so take it slow and you’ll get it over time.

There Note Per String E Minor/G Major PentatonicThree-Note-per-String-Pentatonics

A good way to finger these exercises is by using your first finger (index) on the 12th fret and your fourth finger (pinky) on the 16th & 17th fret. On the middle notes switch between your second and third fingers.

Three Note Pentatonic Exercise 3

Download the PDF here

Three-Note-Per-String-Pentatonics-Ex-3

Download the GuitarPro file here

Three Note Pentatonic Exercise 4

Download the PDF here

Three-Note-Per-String-Pentatonics-Ex-4

Download the GuitarPro file here

Steve Vai Awesomesauce

Finger Tapping 102

In this lesson we’re going to continue our look at beginner finger tapping techniques.

Now we’re gonna kick it up a notch by adding a second finger from our fretting hand into the mix. We’ll be outlining two arpeggios with the notes we’ll play. First is an Esus9 and the second is a B dominant 7.

Remember to focus on keeping the rhythm of the notes even to create that flowing dreamlike sound. Start slowly and increase your speed over time.

Once you feel comfortable with playing this pattern why not try playing it on different strings to see what kind of sound you get.

Finger Tapping 102 for Beginners

Finger Tapping 102 Example

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The-Guitar-Pick-Wide

The Guitar Pick

Playing with a pick (flatpicking) produces a much louder and brighter sound than plucking the strings with your finger alone.

Picks were originally created using bone, shell, wood, metal, stone, or ivory. Today they are made out of plastic, nylon, rubber, felt, tortoiseshell, wood, metal, glass, and stone.

They also come in a large variety of shapes and sizes to suit all styles of guitar playing.

Picks for finger picking are designed to fit onto the fingers and thumb.

Guitar Pick Shapes


Guitar-Picks

Guitar-Woods

Guitar Woods 101

Alot of different variables go into creating a guitar’s overall tone. One of the main factors is wood choice.

Guitar builders have many different types of woods to choose from when constructing guitars. They are chosen for their different tonal characteristics and how they look.

Let’s take a look at six of the most popular types of guitar woods.


Wood-Mahogony

Mahogany

Mahogany is most associated with Gibson guitars and it produces the warmest, fattest guitar tones. Mahogany is used for bodies and necks.

Wood-Maple

Maple

Maple is a very hard and heavy wood. It’s tone is bright with long sustain, and lots of bite. It is a great choice for both bodies and necks.

Wood-Alder

Alder

Alder is light but produces a full sound. Used mostly for bodies it has a well balanced sound with equal doses of lows, mids and highs.

Wood-RoseWood

Rosewood

Rosewood is the most popular wood for constructing fingerboards. Its tone is warm and is suited for rock and blues playing. It’s feel is smooth and fast.

Wood-Swamp-Ash

Swamp Ash

Swamp Ash is another light wood which makes it a great choice for bodies. It has a bright and warm sound and its open grain makes it a nice choice for clear finishes.

Wood-Ebony

Ebony

Ebony is very hard, smooth and fast feeling making it a perfect choice for necks, especially fingerboards. It’s tone is bright with long sustain.

The-Guitar-Neck

The Guitar Neck

There are so many factors that go into the construction of a guitar neck which affects its playability and sound.

From the shape and size of the frets to the contour of the back of the neck. Each player finds a different combination that they consider just right.

Let’s take a look at just a few of the options you have when selecting the right neck for you.

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Take our Part of the Guitar quiz

The Parts of the Guitar

When you sit down with other guitarists to talk shop you’re going to want to sound like you know what you’re talking about.

The first thing that you’ll need to make sure you’re familiar with are all the parts of the guitar. Some are commonly know, while others are a bit trickier.

Let’s take a look at them below.

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Substitue-Dominants

Substitute Dominants

Substitute Dominants are also referred to as Tritone Substitutes because they contain the same tritone as the dominant chord that they are substituting for.

The root of the original dominant and the substitute dominant are also a tritone away from each other.

This means that the tritone sub will resolve down one half step to its target chord.

Substitute Dominants

Substitute-Dominants
Substitue-Dom_Example-Chords